Drysdale

 

 Drysdale ewe and lamb at Beersheba

Drysdale ewe and lamb at Beersheba

History

The Drysdale breed originated from Romney sheep who possessed a "hairy" gene.  Though the research for this trait was done as early as 1929, the Drysdale breed did not emerge from New Zealand until 1960's when a use for this hairy characteristic was realised for carpet wool. New Zealanders began breeding for this wool type. The resulting breed was named after Prof. Dry who did much of the initial research on this hairy gene characteristic.  

Fleece and Fibre

 Close up of Drysdale fleece shows the lack of crimp and what one purchasing an unwashed fleece might expect.

Close up of Drysdale fleece shows the lack of crimp and what one purchasing an unwashed fleece might expect.

This fibre is a very strong wool.  Possibly the strongest wools available on the market. The fleece is long (7-15 cm) with quite a large micron count in the low 40's.  The fibre has very little to no crimp.

Fibre Uses

 Beautiful handspun pure Drysdale yarn (provided by Wendy Beer of Beersheba).

Beautiful handspun pure Drysdale yarn (provided by Wendy Beer of Beersheba).

The fleece is ideal for items which require hard wearing, durable surfaces.  Carpets and rugs are the traditional uses for this fibre.  Other items that are perfect for this fibre are market bags, handbag (in a carpet bag style), placemats, etc.

Fibre Preparation

This fleece washes easily because of it's open, crimpless nature. Processing can be done using large combs.  It could also be flicked and worsted spun from the tip or cut end.  Play with twist to create a stronger or "softer" yarn to suit the purpose.

Other Uses

This breed has been traditionally bred for its wool.  It is not listed as a dual purpose breed anywhere.  

Where to Find Fibre or Products to Support this Breed

Beersheba

Other Links

Drysdale Gallery

Heritage Sheep Australia - Drysdale are one of the breeds supported by this group.

Australian Stud Sheep Breeders Association (ASSBA)

Articles: Beersheba in "Stock and Land"